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Monday, April 23
 

8:00am CDT

Registration/Refreshments
Monday April 23, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am CDT
TBA

9:00am CDT

Welcome & Remarks
Monday April 23, 2018 9:00am - 9:15am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

9:15am CDT

Keynote Speaker: Lisa Spiro, "Creating a Community-Driven Digital Archive: The Harvey Memories Project"
Between August 17 and 30, 2017, Tropical Storm Harvey -- later Hurricane Harvey -- crisscrossed the Southeast corner of Texas, killing 88 Texans, damaging or destroying more than 119,000 homes in Harris County, and causing as much as $190 billion dollars in damage. Behind these numbers are thousands of stories of loss, trauma, recovery, and resilience.

Soon after the flooding, a dialogue developed between Rice University, the University of Houston Libraries, Harris County Public Libraries, and Houston Public Libraries about how we might build a digital archive that enables people to share their stories about Harvey.

Funded through a Rice University Houston Engagement and Recovery Effort (HERE) grant, the Harvey Memories Project (HMP) aims to to collect personal narratives, photos, audio, and video about the experience of Harvey in a digital archive. Its core values include a focus on the community, diversity, compassion, and sustainability. Developing such a digital archive raises complex questions: How do we make the archive useful both to people who experienced Harvey and to researchers who want to study their experiences? How can we respect contributors’ privacy while inviting them to share openly? How do we design the archive to make it easy for HMP contributors from diverse backgrounds to submit materials to the collection, while also making it easy for all users to find objects in the archive?  

The HMP is still at an early stage of development, and this presentation will not present final answers or a finished product; instead, it will invite attendees to explore the germination of a digital archive that honors personal experiences, contributes to a collective understanding, and raises issues pertinent to collecting digital objects meaningful on both a personal and communal scale.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Spiro

Lisa Spiro

Executive Director of Digital Scholarship Services, Fondren Library, Rice University
Lisa Spiro serves as the Executive Director of Digital Scholarship Services at Rice University’s Fondren Library, where she oversees the institutional repository, the Digital Media Commons, and the Kelley Center for Government Information, Data and Geospatial Services. She has published... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 9:15am - 10:00am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

10:00am CDT

Personal Objects as Gateways to Community Memory (PDA & COMMUNITY MEMORY)
Personal archiving is first and foremost an effort to preserve memories of the past. Through the preservation of photographs, documents, and other important personal objects, personal collections represent individual creators as well as the family and community groups they occupy. Community and participatory archives, in which community members contribute to archival collection, description, and preservation practices, are attempts to document their members’ individual and collective narratives.

The Mass. Memories Road Show is one such participatory archive project that works to “bring together local residents of all ages, ethnicities, races and backgrounds in lively and thoughtfully planned public events that celebrate each person's family history and contribution to the community” (Mass. Memories, 2016, p. 4). During Mass. Memories events, participants contribute photos that reflect themselves and their families in their community; those photos are digitized and video interviews documenting the story behind such photos are recorded.

The focus of our research are the stories behind the objects contributed to these community archives. Our research aims to explore the personal context of community archive participants by unveiling the stories behind the objects the participants contribute to the community archives. We believe that such research will allow for a nuanced understanding of the layers of memories created and fostered through participatory archive efforts.

To reach this nuanced understanding of the Mass. Memories participants’ narratives, we categorized the objects contributed and revealed themes from the experiences, memories, and sentiments evoked when participants discussed the objects. Our analysis results indicate that how people perceive and appraise their past life experiences and memories within the community (including their personal connections with the community, involvement with community events and organizations, reflection on community history, and their identity as a community member) has an influence on the formation of community and participatory archives.

Reference:
The Mass. Memories Road Show. (2016). The Mass. Memories Road Show Project Handbook: A Planning Guide for Local Communities. Boston, MA: University of Massachusetts Boston, Joseph P. Healey Library.


Speakers
JK

Jeonghyun Kim

Associate Professor & Director of Digital Curation and Data Management Graduate Academic Certificate Program, University of North Texas
Jeonghyun Kim is an associate professor in the Department of Information Science at the University of North Texas, where she teaches Introduction to Digital Libraries and Digital Curation Fundamentals. She is currently serving as director of Digital Curation and Data Management Graduate... Read More →
avatar for Ana Roeschley

Ana Roeschley

Ph.D. Student, University of North Texas
Ana Roeschley is a PhD student at the University of North Texas. She has a BA in English from the University of Texas at Austin, an MS in LIS and an MA in History from Simmons College. Ana's research interests include collective memory, participatory archival culture, and digital... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 10:00am - 10:20am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

10:20am CDT

Identity and Roots for Chinese American Immigrants (PDA & COMMUNITY MEMORY)
This presentation will describe the efforts of gathering oral histories, family trees, medical history, and behavioral genograms of the presenter's Chinese family members residing in mainland China. It will address changing cultural barriers to personal archiving such as technology, language, medical advancements, and war. To conclude, the talk will address the function of personal archiving on immigrant identity formation. 

Speakers
SW

Sandra Wang

Sandra Wang is a former student assistant in the Metadata Library Unit at the University of Houston and worked on the Digital Archives and Institutional Repository (IR). Uprooted from a major Chinese City to a small town in Texas, this project is an attempt to connect the past to... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 10:20am - 10:40am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

10:40am CDT

Archives outside of Archives: Community Centered Archival Practice Education by the Houston Archives Collective (PDA & COMMUNITY MEMORY)
Out of recognition and frustration with traditional archival outreach, the Houston Archives Collective was found in the summer of 2017 to bridge gaps between institutionalized outreach efforts and the needs of the Houston community.

This presentation will address non-hierarchical approaches for disseminating preservation knowledge, best-practices in archives, and community support across  Houston's communities: the arts, education, activism, and LGBTQ. 

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Cruces

Elizabeth Cruces

Hispanic Collections Archivist, University of Houston
Elizabeth Lisa Cruces is the Hispanic Collections Archivist and Curator at University of Houston. Her research interest include power and oppression in archives, memory making, community archives, zines, and the application fronterizmo in archives.


Monday April 23, 2018 10:40am - 11:00am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

11:00am CDT

Eliza Jones' Collection
Indigenous scholar and distinguished Tl'eeyegge Hut'aane (Koyukon Athabascan) linguist, Dr. Eliza Jones, of Koyukuk, Alaska, wished for the youth of the future to know their language and traditional ways. Since 1970 she has diligently documented the stories, songs, and genealogy of the people in Interior Alaska. Audio, video, text and photographic data are being digitized and shared through the Mukurtu Content Management System platform on the Internet. The Alaska Native Language Archive at the University of Alaska Fairbank, Washington State University, K-12 school Yukon-Koyukuk School District, and community members collaborate on this project. The variety and nature of Dr. Jones’ files provide an excellent test case for controlled and mediated access to primary materials.


Speakers
SP

Susan Paskvan

Native Language Coordinator, Yukon-Koyukuk School District
Susan Paskvan is Native Language Coordinator for the Yukon-Koyukuk School District, and the daughter of Eliza Jones, whose collection is the focus of our presentation.
ST

Siri Tuttle

Director, Alaska Native Language Archive
Siri Tuttle is a professor of linguistics and Director of the Alaska Native Language Archive. She has been working with Athabascan language speakers in Alaska for over 25 years to support the documentation and revitalization of their languages.


Monday April 23, 2018 11:00am - 11:20am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

11:20am CDT

PDA & Community Memory - Q&A
Panel discussion with presenters.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Cruces

Elizabeth Cruces

Hispanic Collections Archivist, University of Houston
Elizabeth Lisa Cruces is the Hispanic Collections Archivist and Curator at University of Houston. Her research interest include power and oppression in archives, memory making, community archives, zines, and the application fronterizmo in archives.
JK

Jeonghyun Kim

Associate Professor & Director of Digital Curation and Data Management Graduate Academic Certificate Program, University of North Texas
Jeonghyun Kim is an associate professor in the Department of Information Science at the University of North Texas, where she teaches Introduction to Digital Libraries and Digital Curation Fundamentals. She is currently serving as director of Digital Curation and Data Management Graduate... Read More →
SP

Susan Paskvan

Native Language Coordinator, Yukon-Koyukuk School District
Susan Paskvan is Native Language Coordinator for the Yukon-Koyukuk School District, and the daughter of Eliza Jones, whose collection is the focus of our presentation.
avatar for Ana Roeschley

Ana Roeschley

Ph.D. Student, University of North Texas
Ana Roeschley is a PhD student at the University of North Texas. She has a BA in English from the University of Texas at Austin, an MS in LIS and an MA in History from Simmons College. Ana's research interests include collective memory, participatory archival culture, and digital... Read More →
ST

Siri Tuttle

Director, Alaska Native Language Archive
Siri Tuttle is a professor of linguistics and Director of the Alaska Native Language Archive. She has been working with Athabascan language speakers in Alaska for over 25 years to support the documentation and revitalization of their languages.
SW

Sandra Wang

Sandra Wang is a former student assistant in the Metadata Library Unit at the University of Houston and worked on the Digital Archives and Institutional Repository (IR). Uprooted from a major Chinese City to a small town in Texas, this project is an attempt to connect the past to... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 11:20am - 11:40am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

11:40am CDT

Lunch
Attendees can choose from the many campus dining options available. For more information about on campus options visit http://www.uh.edu/campus-life/dining/

Monday April 23, 2018 11:40am - 1:00pm CDT
Your Choice

1:00pm CDT

Lightning Talks
Scan Days - John Sarnowski
ScanDay events aim to digitize and catalog letters, photos, souvenirs, and other artifacts related to local history. This lightning talk highligts events held around the state of Wisconsin at public libraries and churches.

“To Save Press 9”: voicemails as audio worth preserving - Lucy Rosenbloom
While we may not always have the opportunity to sit down with our loved ones to record oral histories, voicemails provide us with day-to-day, candid, and personal recordings from our friends and family. These messages left on our cell phones as digital audio files allow us to preserve the voice and words of the people in our lives. This presentation will show an example of a simple “DIY” archive of voicemails using a smartphone and email.

Mobile Digitization Kits: A Potential Tool for Personal Archiving - Ruohoa Han
Mobile digitization kits are portable collections of tools for converting analog materials to digital formats. They often include essential digitization hardware (e.g., scanners, digital cameras, and laptops) and software (e.g. Adobe Photoshop), as well as digitization knowledge and expertise. In contrast to traditional digitization models, in which materials are often brought to institutions and professionals for digitization, mobile digitization kits enable digitization to be “taken out” and brought to communities and individuals instead. In this way, they provide not only practical opportunities for individuals to get their important personal materials digitized, but also interesting potential in demystifying, educating about, and democratizing digitization. This lightning talk will provide a quick overview of mobile digitization kits and how they can be a potentially innovative tool for personal archiving, using the Indigitization project and the Culture in Transit project as examples of how such kits can be designed and utilized in different ways to bring individuals, communities, personal/community archiving, and digitization together.

Permanent Digital Preservation for All - Permanent Legacy Foundation’s Permanent.org - Robert Friedman

The Memory Lab Network at Houston Public Library - Matt Richardson
Houston Public Library will soon begin offering digital preservation services to the public as a part of the Memory Lab Network. This project emerges from National Leadership Grant awarded to DC Public Library (DCPL), in partnership with the Public Library Association (PLA), to build Memory Lab programs in seven public libraries across the U.S. based on the DCPL Memory Lab model. This lightning talk will discuss the program from the perspective of one of the recently selected and newly trained project partners.

Family History at the Houston Public Library / Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research - Joy Oria

Learn about different ways of digitizing your family history materials through the Clayton Library.



Speakers
avatar for Robert Friedman

Robert Friedman

Executive Director, Permanent Legacy Foundation
Talk to me about personal, private and permanent cloud storage.
RH

Ruohua Han

Doctoral Student, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Ruohua Han is a PhD student at the iSchool, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She completed her bachelor’s and master’s degree in Management Science with a focus on records management and archives administration at Renmin University of China, and has conducted and published... Read More →
JO

Joy Oria

Senior Library Services Specialist, Outreach and Programming Coordinator, Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research
Joy Oria joined the Houston Public Library / Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research staff in 2015, where in addition to assisting customers in their family history research, she focuses on program planning and outreach efforts. Her genealogical research strengths include... Read More →
MR

Matt Richardson

Photography Archive Supervisor, Houston Public Library
Matt Richardson is the Photography Archive Supervisor at Houston Public Library's Houston Metropolitan Research Center. He is also involved in digital initiatives such as the Harvey Memories Project and HPL's participation in the Memory Lab Network. Prior to joining HPL, Matt worked... Read More →
avatar for Lucy Rosenbloom

Lucy Rosenbloom

Systems Librarian, Loyola University New Orleans
Lucy Rosenbloom is the Systems Librarian at Loyola University New Orleans.
avatar for John Sarnowski

John Sarnowski

Director, ResCarta Foundation
John Sarnowski is a director of the non-profit ResCarta Foundation and has over 25 years’ experience in building digital collections. He was responsible for creating millions of digital objects for learned societies, libraries and major corporations as the director of Imaging Products... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

2:05pm CDT

Black Folk Magic: PDA from Personal Experience (PERSONAL EXPERIENCE)
This session will discuss how the everyday experiences of black youth and marginalized people are often overlooked in archived narratives, even in personal lives. It will outline how the presenter’s personal experiences with PDA informed an examination of how we educate others on personal digital archiving. Often we think about transferring institutional values onto our communities, but this session will also showcase projects in which community values are central.

Speakers
avatar for Camille Thomas

Camille Thomas

Scholarly Publishing Librarian, Texas Tech University
Camille Thomas is the Scholarly Publishing Librarian at Texas Tech University Libraries. She holds a Master of Science in Library and Information Services from Florida State University. Ms. Thomas has worked as the first position dedicated to scholarly communication at TTU for the... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 2:05pm - 2:25pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

2:25pm CDT

When You're "It": Preserving and Sharing the Family Archives (PERSONAL EXPERIENCE)
Initially using digitization to make historical photographs, oral histories, and moving images accessible to the public in her role as a professional archivist, she found it necessary to apply those same concepts as family historian, genealogist, and keeper of the family archives. As the eldest child, the tasks fell to her naturally, but when serving as executrix for her parents' estate (2016-2017), she came into possession of several generations of correspondence, photographs, film, audiotapes, and documents. Beyond the physical aspects of preserving these items, she was also challenged with the need to share the family history with the younger generation. A grandmother of six, she chose to use both digital and physical methods to preserve and disseminate images, along with their context in the family history, to her kin. Having lost two of her three siblings (1994, 2002), she had the additional challenge of providing her perspective and knowledge of the childhoods of both these siblings to their children. While a seemingly daunting task to accomplish, she streamlined the process by setting project priorities and deadlines to get results. Software, apps, and hardware used in the project will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Leslie Wagner

Leslie Wagner

Associate Archivist, University of Texas at Arlington
Leslie Wagner is an Associate Archivist at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). She has also served as Archivist and Historian for Methodist Hospitals of Dallas and as Archivist for both the Dallas Holocaust Museum and the Dallas Jewish Historical Society. A former chair of... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 2:25pm - 2:45pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

2:45pm CDT

Megaton Goes Boom: Archiving and Preserving My Father's First Comic Book (PERSONAL EXPERIENCE)
The 1980s were an interesting time to be a comics fan. The previous decade saw well-known creators leaving the industry’s two big companies (Marvel and DC) for new, independent publishers. Cheerful, do-gooding superheroes gave way to more personal (and, in some cases, darker character studies) in this market, paving the way for a wave of do-it-yourself comics publishing. In the early ‘80s, my father, Gary S. Carlson, stepped into this arena with “Megaton,” a self-published anthology comic featuring talented artists and writers he had met at Midwestern comic conventions. Megaton lasted eight issues, folding at the end of the decade as the market glutted with independent comics and the big companies plucked his stable of collaborators. He stayed in comics for another three decades, but the Megaton chapter was over. In 2016, my father began inventorying his Megaton files with the goal of creating a “remastered” digital version of his comic. This presentation will share my father’s experiences in personal digital archiving as he confronts the now-obsolete techniques that produced the original comics, faces disintegrating master materials, and juggles several different surviving sources of varying quality. The presentation will also discuss the importance of preserving DIY comics and Megaton’s effect on the founding of Image Comics, a powerhouse 1990s publisher.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Carlson

Scott Carlson

Metadata Coordinator, Rice University
Scott Carlson is the Metadata Coordinator at Rice University's Fondren Library. Scott received his MLIS from Dominican University in River Forest, Illinois. He was an award-winning cartoonist in college, but is now interested in data analysis, archiving, preservation, and woodwor... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 2:45pm - 3:05pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

3:05pm CDT

Personal Experience - Q&A Panel
Personal experience presenters panel discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Carlson

Scott Carlson

Metadata Coordinator, Rice University
Scott Carlson is the Metadata Coordinator at Rice University's Fondren Library. Scott received his MLIS from Dominican University in River Forest, Illinois. He was an award-winning cartoonist in college, but is now interested in data analysis, archiving, preservation, and woodwor... Read More →
JP

Julia Pontes

MFA Candidate, Photographer, Personal Photographic Archive Consultant, California Institute of the Arts
Júlia Pontés is a Brazilian/Argentinian photographer and personal photographic archive consultant based in Los Angeles. She is currently an MFA Candidate at the California Institute of the Arts - double major - Photography & Media and Film & Video.She holds a certificate in General... Read More →
avatar for Camille Thomas

Camille Thomas

Scholarly Publishing Librarian, Texas Tech University
Camille Thomas is the Scholarly Publishing Librarian at Texas Tech University Libraries. She holds a Master of Science in Library and Information Services from Florida State University. Ms. Thomas has worked as the first position dedicated to scholarly communication at TTU for the... Read More →
avatar for Leslie Wagner

Leslie Wagner

Associate Archivist, University of Texas at Arlington
Leslie Wagner is an Associate Archivist at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). She has also served as Archivist and Historian for Methodist Hospitals of Dallas and as Archivist for both the Dallas Holocaust Museum and the Dallas Jewish Historical Society. A former chair of... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 3:05pm - 3:25pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

3:25pm CDT

Break
Monday April 23, 2018 3:25pm - 3:45pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

3:45pm CDT

Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage (3 presentations + Panel Q&A)
This 3-presentation panel will focus on the work and efforts put forth by the University of Houston’s Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage program. Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage is a program to locate, preserve and make available the written legacy of Latinas and Latinos in the United States since colonial times until 1960. Through 25 years of successful work Recovery has not only being able to inscribe the excluded history of Latinas/os, but also has created an inclusive and vast digital repository that facilitates scholarship in this area of studies. The presentations in this panel will focus on the importance of recovery work in the writing, teaching, and understanding of history. We will consider how local personal archives have helped to fill in the gaps of mainstream history. Presentations in this panel will also include a discussion of the process of creating the first Digital Humanities Research programming focused on US Latina/o Studies. We will detail the goals and challenges of this mission, as well as the importance of educating the community in digital methods that preserve and disseminate minority voices. 

Speakers
avatar for Lorena Gauthereau

Lorena Gauthereau

Postdoctoral Fellow, UH Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage
Lorena Gauthereau holds a Ph.D. in English and an M.A. in Hispanic Studies with a specialization in Chicana/o literature. She is currently a CLIR-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow for Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage, where she is helping to develop digital humanities programming... Read More →
avatar for Gabriela Baeza Ventura

Gabriela Baeza Ventura

Associate Professor & Executive Editor, University of Houston & Arte Público Press
Gabriela Baeza Ventura is Associate Professor of Hispanic Literature in the Hispanic Studies at the University of Houston, where she teaches courses on US Latina/o literature for graduate and undergraduate students.  She is also Executive Editor for Arte Público Press, where she... Read More →
avatar for Carolina A. Villarroel

Carolina A. Villarroel

Director of Research, UH Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage
Carolina A. Villarroel holds a Ph.D. in Spanish literature with a specialization in U.S. Latino Literature and Women's Studies.  She is the former archivist in charge of the Mexican American and African American Collections at the Houston Metropolitan Research Center at the Houston... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 3:45pm - 5:00pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

5:00pm CDT

Posters & Demonstrations Reception
Please join us after the first day of conference for refreshments while you discuss posters and demonstrations from more presenters.

Poster sessions & demonstrations will include:

Delis Negrón Digital Biography: From a Personal Archive to a Digital Project - Sylvia Fernandez & Annette Zapata

Permanent Digital Preservation for All - Permanent Legacy Foundation’s Permanent.org - Robert Friedman
Permanent.org is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that is focused on permanent, enduring cloud based data storage for all people. Permanent.org aims to fulfill the goal of permanent and secure digital archiving.

Texas Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture,  Prairie View A&M University - Michael Hurd

Descendants of Olivewood Cemetery - Kyle Cooper

Texas Genealogy Challenges  - Linda Reynolds
Genealogists are the gathers and keepers of family information and historical documents. Each genealogist organizes their materials in various ways, it could be by surname, a program number or even by geographical area. In some cases, there is no separation of original material, photocopied material, and notes. With the proliferation of digitization more genealogists want to share their family treasure troves. All issues that institutions have for digitizing material, genealogists have but on a smaller scale.
As the archivist for the Texas State Genealogical Society I help genealogists navigate the digitization realm by simplifying the process to something that is doable for them. What genealogists typically do is put material on a scanner and then upload to their social media or personal web sites without thought of preservation or care. I help them think about and plan for long term access, preservation, and organization. I also provide connections to local institutions that have digital community collections such as the Portal to Texas History and our own East Texas Digital Archives, Community Collection.

The Sig Byrd Digital Archive Project - Robert Kimberly

William J. Hill Texas Artisans & Artists Archive Demonstration - Margaret Culbertson & Michelle Verret Johnson
Initiated by Bayou Bend’s Powell Library and launched in 2012, the William J. Hill Texas Artisans and Artists Archive, a free online archive, is intended to facilitate research and appreciation of Texas decorative arts, painting, photography, architecture, and other media.  It has been funded by a generous donation from William J. Hill and a grant from IMLS.   Now containing over 95,000 records, the continually evolving archive provides primary source materials of the 19th century as well as later research and publications about Texas artisans and artists and images of the objects they created.  Records are contributed by partner institutions, volunteers, fellows, and staff members.  By including thousands of census and city directory records for individual artisans, in addition to newspaper advertisements and photographs of actual objects, the Archive provides exceptional widespread coverage of 19th century artisans and artists across the state.  The inclusion of account books, journals, receipts, and other detailed documentation of individual artisans enables the archive to provide in-depth material on the actual process of creating and marketing art and decorative arts.  




Speakers
KC

Kyle Cooper

Descendants of Olivewood
MC

Margaret Culbertson

William J. Hill Texas Artisans & Artists Archive
Margaret Culbertson is the Librarian at Bayou Bend’s Kitty King Powell Library, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, where she is also Project Director of the William J. Hill Texas Artisans and Artists Archive.  After receiving a BA in Art History from Rice University and an MS in Library... Read More →
avatar for Sylvia A. Fernández

Sylvia A. Fernández

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Houston, TX
Ph.D. Candidate with the Hispanic Studies Department at the University of Houston. Her interest lies in U.S. Latinx and border literature and cultures, archives and print culture, postcolonial digital humanities and feminist theory.
MH

Michael Hurd

Director, Texas Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture, Prairie View A&M University
MV

Michelle Verret Johnson

Michelle Verret Johnson joined the William J. Hill Texas Artisans and Artists Archive as Project Manager in April, 2014.  She holds a Master of Library and Information Science from Louisiana State University and a Master of Arts in History from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette... Read More →
RK

Robert Kimberly

Sig Byrd Digital Archive Project
avatar for Linda Reynolds

Linda Reynolds

Director, East Texas Research Center, Stephen F Austin State University
Linda Reynolds has been the Director of the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin State University since 2007. Her involvement with digitization began in 2003 with a Texas Telecommunication Infrastructure Fund (TIF) grant with the creation of Texas Tides. She currently serves... Read More →


Monday April 23, 2018 5:00pm - 6:30pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX
 
Tuesday, April 24
 

8:00am CDT

Registration & Refreshments
Tuesday April 24, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

9:00am CDT

Day 2: Welcome & Remarks
Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:00am - 9:15am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

9:15am CDT

Keynote Speaker: Caroline Frick with the Texas Archive of the Moving Image, "On the Move: Lessons Learned from a Decade of Digitization Across Texas"
Since 2008, the Texas Archive of the Moving Image has driven nearly 17,000 miles of lone star highways, two lane roads, and even a sandy beach with the Texas Film Round-Up program. The Film Round-Up, a program developed in partnership with the Office of the Governor’s Texas Film Commission, offers free digitization, educational programs, and preservation assistance for obsolete motion pictures and videos related to the state. The result?  Tens of thousands of hours, and over 30 TB, of digital video capturing the life of Texas companies, notables, and families -- at work and at play, eating, celebrating, and even mourning. The archive has been proud and grateful to have collaborated with a wide range of organizations, from rural historical societies to preeminent university archives and special collections, as well as hundreds of individuals to re-think what American film history should be and how contemporary media preservation is defined. This keynote will provide background and overview of the work of the Texas Archive of the Moving Image in its quest to discover, preserve, and share hidden histories of the state.  

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Frick

Caroline Frick

Associate Professor, University of Texas
Caroline Frick serves as both an Associate Professor in the Radio-TV-Film Department at The University of Texas at Austin and is the founder and Executive Director of the Texas Archive of the Moving Image: www.texasarchive.org.  Prior to her work in Texas, Dr. Frick worked in media... Read More →


Tuesday April 24, 2018 9:15am - 10:00am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

10:00am CDT

Break & Discuss
Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:00am - 10:20am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

10:20am CDT

Preserving Non-Fiction Interactives (UNIQUE PERSPECTIVES in PDA)
There is a corner of the web that tells us stories — non-fiction stories, specifically—which let us in on each other’s realities, ask us to slow down and contemplate. These works have many names: immersives, interactive documentaries (aka i-docs) or transmedia productions. Their makers draw from a large tool set: from playful game interactions, to networked, participatory, or data storytelling. Regardless of their underlying media or methods, however, these works share a common challenge: The average life span of a web page is 100 days.

The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision has been exploring web archiving options since 2011 and over the past year has put a special emphasis on preserving non-fiction interactives, an intricate mode of online storytelling that is celebrated at the annual documentary festival IDFA. Together with the festival's DocLab section, Sound and Vision has talked to producers as well as individual creators and compiled an overview of potential solutions for safeguarding content created at the cusp of advancing technologies. 

Speakers
avatar for Erwin Verbruggen

Erwin Verbruggen

Product manager digital scholarship & knowledge sharing, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
Erwin Verbruggen is a user studies and digital preservation expert who works on several (inter)national projects in the field of preservation and open data. Erwin obtained an MA in Preservation and Presentation of the Moving Image at the University of Amsterdam. He interned at the... Read More →


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:20am - 10:40am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

10:40am CDT

Capturing Identity: Using Institutional Recordkeeping Systems to Explore Personal Records (UNIQUE PERSPECTIVES in PDA)
In this presentation, we will briefly introduce the Bertillon system of criminal identification as a means of exploring the functions of records created both by and about incarcerated individuals, as well as archival distinctions between institutional and personal records. Although the Bertillon system was implemented for a relatively short period of time (roughly 1890 until the end of World War I), the practice reverberates through contemporary methods of criminal identification and documentation.

These prison records, created for institutional purposes to curb recidivism, are a type of personal record that is not created by the individual but is nonetheless personal. Through our work with Bertillon records over the past three years, we’ve traced the movement of individual identification cards from the moment of creation through to their present-day archival custody.

This work has raised a number of questions and concerns for our research team, which we will explore in our presentation:
- How do our interpretations of privacy change depending on context?
- What is the role of the archive in mediating access to these types of personal records? Are we responsible for controlling access to these materials, especially if our own ethical concerns deviate from the official access policies of the institution where the records actually reside?
- What is the role of recordkeeping in perpetuating the notion of invisible labor?
- How do official recordkeeping practices impact particularly vulnerable populations?  


Speakers
avatar for Chelsea Gunn

Chelsea Gunn

Doctoral Student, University of Pittsburgh
Chelsea Gunn is a doctoral student at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Computing and Information. Previously, she has worked in a variety of archives and cultural heritage settings. Her research is grounded in personal archives, digital preservation, and professional ethi... Read More →
avatar for Aisling Quigley

Aisling Quigley

Doctoral Candidate, University of Pittsburgh
As a practitioner/scholar of the information sciences, Aisling engages in research related to information organization, digital preservation, interactive narrative production, and usability. Although she works primarily within the context of museums, Aisling is motivated to improve... Read More →


Tuesday April 24, 2018 10:40am - 11:00am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

11:20am CDT

Unique Perspectives in PDA - Q&A
Panel discussion with presenters.

Speakers
avatar for Chelsea Gunn

Chelsea Gunn

Doctoral Student, University of Pittsburgh
Chelsea Gunn is a doctoral student at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Computing and Information. Previously, she has worked in a variety of archives and cultural heritage settings. Her research is grounded in personal archives, digital preservation, and professional ethi... Read More →
avatar for Aisling Quigley

Aisling Quigley

Doctoral Candidate, University of Pittsburgh
As a practitioner/scholar of the information sciences, Aisling engages in research related to information organization, digital preservation, interactive narrative production, and usability. Although she works primarily within the context of museums, Aisling is motivated to improve... Read More →
avatar for Erwin Verbruggen

Erwin Verbruggen

Product manager digital scholarship & knowledge sharing, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
Erwin Verbruggen is a user studies and digital preservation expert who works on several (inter)national projects in the field of preservation and open data. Erwin obtained an MA in Preservation and Presentation of the Moving Image at the University of Amsterdam. He interned at the... Read More →


Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:20am - 11:40am CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

11:40am CDT

Lunch
Attendees can choose from the many campus dining options available. For more information about on campus options visit http://www.uh.edu/campus-life/dining/

Tuesday April 24, 2018 11:40am - 1:20pm CDT
Your Choice

1:20pm CDT

Curators Needed: How Public Libraries are Bringing Community Members into their Web Archiving Practice (3 presentations + Panel Q&A)
Public libraries have long served their communities as stewards of local history. They have traditionally collected print materials that document their regions, but the movement towards increasingly digital and personal publishing has left gaps in the historical record—gaps in the memory of who these communities are, how they communicate, and what they may learn from one another. Due to technical challenges and lack of available training, few public libraries build archives of community history as it is represented on the World Wide Web in particular, though the web has for many years now been where community members connect and share.

In 2017, the Internet Archive received grants for a two-year “Community Webs” project to address this gap in collections and services by providing education, training, and tools to enable 27 public libraries to build collections of historically-valuable, web-published materials documenting their local communities. Speakers representing two of these libraries will discuss how they approach the curatorial and outreach challenges related to building localized special collections representative of the diverse populations that they serve. In particular, they will demonstrate how they include both internal stakeholders at their institutions as well as public stakeholders in the selection process of archiving community websites. They will share the digital literacy takeaways from sessions offered to the public and the lessons taken forward in the planning of future sessions.

Natalie Milbrodt from Queens Public Library, Emily Ward from East Baton Rouge Parish Library and Karl Blumenthal from the Internet Archive will give short individual presentations, followed by a Q&A with the audience.


Speakers
avatar for Karl-Rainer Blumenthal

Karl-Rainer Blumenthal

Web Archivist, Internet Archive
I help people to build web archives through training, technical support, development, and documentation, as a web archivist for Archive-It at the Internet Archive. I served as Vice Chair and Chair of SAA's Web Archiving Section and founding co-chair of the Art Libraries Society of... Read More →
avatar for Natalie Milbrodt

Natalie Milbrodt

Coordinator, Metadata Services and Director, Queens Memory Project, Queens Public Library
Natalie Milbrodt leads Queens Public Library's Metadata Services division, responsible for cataloging and digitizing the library's collections. She founded the Queens Memory Project, the library's community archiving and oral history program.
EW

Emily Ward

Digital Archivist, East Baton Rouge Parish Library
Emily Ward is the Digital Archivist for the East Baton Rouge Parish Library.  She graduated from Louisiana State University with a Masters in Library and Information Science in 2014 and became a Certified Archivist in 2016.  She received her undergraduate degree from Miami University... Read More →


Tuesday April 24, 2018 1:20pm - 2:35pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

2:40pm CDT

Break
Tuesday April 24, 2018 2:40pm - 3:00pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

3:00pm CDT

Building a modern Memex (ROLES & OPPORTUNITIES)
The Memex, first proposed in 1945, was to be the ultimate personal archive. In a desk-sized device, users would be able to store all their correspondence, reports, and libraries. Add-on devices like a head-mounted camera, a note-taking tablet, and a voice recorder would allow for supplementary data input. Most importantly, users would be able to link together arbitrary items in their archives and then use these connections to navigate through their library.

Unfortunately, the Memex was never built but the device has had a large impact on the history of computing and hypertext, giving many a powerful vision of how computers should be able to serve humans.

I’ve also been inspired. I’m building a modern digital version of a Memex in an attempt to create a complete personal digital archive of my life. So far, my system has every message I’ve exchanged over the last fifteen years, every photo I’ve taken, years of browser history, and much more. This data is sourced through a few dozen importers I’ve written that pull data from the different digital sources and services I use on a daily basis. A front-end app lets me organize, visualize, and search across these minute-by-minute records of my life.

I’ll give a historical overview of the Memex and its impact on history. I’ll follow this by giving a demo of my personal digital archiving system. I’ll also discuss some of the challenge I’ve had with things like choosing a schema or trying to extract data from providers that aren’t too keen on giving it up.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Louis

Andrew Louis

Software Developer
Andrew Louis is a software developer from Toronto. After learning about the Memex and finding out that it was never built in 1945, he decided to try to build one. Previously, he was the co-founder and CTO of ShopLocket, an ecommerce startup acquired in 2014.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:00pm - 3:20pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

3:20pm CDT

From Hope to Failure and Back Again: The Story of Indie Preserves (ROLES & OPPORTUNITIES)
In 2015, Scott Carlson and Norie Guthrie started Indie Preserves. Based on survey data culled from DIY and Indie music label owners, they created a blog that offered physical and digital preservation tips with the goal of helping those that they surveyed. After presenting at SXSW, the duo realized that their intended audience may not have shared their preservation enthusiasm. This presentation explores this journey: what the duo learned in their study, how they tried to help, how they interpreted their failure, and how they moved forward with new approaches. 

Speakers
avatar for Norie Guthrie

Norie Guthrie

Archivist - Special Collections Librarian, Woodson Research Center
Norie Guthrie specializes in collecting and processing music materials from the Houston Folk Music Archive, which she began in 2016. She and Scott Carlson edited "Music Preservation and Archiving Today" for Rowman & Littlefield, published May 2018.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:20pm - 3:40pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

3:40pm CDT

The Memory Lab Network (ROLES & OPPORTUNITIES)
DC Public Library (DCPL) has partnered with the Public Library Association and the Library of Congress to bring Memory Lab digital preservation programs to seven public libraries across the U.S. Over one year Memory Lab Network partners are receiving training, mentoring, and financial support to create digitization stations and curriculum to build public knowledge and skills around the complex and paralyzing problems of personal digital archiving through their own Memory Lab programs.  The partner libraries and DCPL will form the foundation of the Memory Lab Network, a support system of libraries that can assist, advise, and build on each others’ innovations, challenges, and growing first-hand expertise. By expanding the number of Memory Lab programs nationally, creating variation among those labs, and assessing their successes, challenges, failures, the Memory Lab Network will create a model that is robust, flexible, and adoptable by public libraries across the world. Through publication and centralized project documentation, workflows, and program information open to all, the network will lower the barriers for libraries to learn about and consider adding digital preservation tools and programs to their own public services, providing yet more opportunity for iteration, improvement, and adoption of Memory Labs.  The project is funded through a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Algee

Lauren Algee

Senior Innovation Specialist, Library of Congress
Lauren is outgoing Chair of the SAA Public Libraries Archives and Special Collections Section. As a member of the Library of Congress Labs team she is a Community Manager for By the People, a crowdsourcing project which invites the public to explore and make LC digital collections... Read More →


Tuesday April 24, 2018 3:40pm - 4:00pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

4:00pm CDT

Documentary opportunities and archival realities: Reconsidering the place of the archivist in the documentation of 21st Century digital lives (ROLES & OPPORTUNITIES)
At a time when archivists are seeking more diversification and social inclusion within the documentary record, have we given pause to consider who and what really constitutes personal archives?

Digital technologies have cut across the everyday to empower people from all walks of life to more easily record and communicate their daily activities. But in this era of digital self-documentation, and with it an unprecedented potential of capturing documentary heritage created by everyday individuals, do archivists truly have a sense of where the value lies within this new frontier?

This presentation highlights important questions that archivists should be asking themselves when dealing with archival appraisal, acquisition and custody in the digital present. In a discussion covering issues such as the essentializing and epitomizing of complex social phenomena by archivists, the costs of custody-based archival practices, as well as the idea of the personal fonds or collection in the digital age, the presenters ultimately suggest that traditional practices of archiving the lives of individuals in society must change if archivists are to become conscientious facilitators of digital documentary heritage.


Speakers
JB

Jordan Bass

Coordinator for Research Services and Digital Strategies, University of Manitoba Libraries
Jordan Bass is the Coordinator for Research Services and Digital Strategies at the University of Manitoba Libraries. His research to date has focused on personal digital archives, digital curation workflows as well as research data management.
GP

Gabrielle Prefontaine

Dean of Libraries, University of Winnipeg
Gabrielle Prefontaine is currently the Dean of Libraries at the University of Winnipeg. Gabrielle is also the former Head Archivist of the University of Winnipeg.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 4:00pm - 4:20pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

4:20pm CDT

Roles & Opportunities - Q&A Panel
Roles & Opportunities presenters panel discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Algee

Lauren Algee

Senior Innovation Specialist, Library of Congress
Lauren is outgoing Chair of the SAA Public Libraries Archives and Special Collections Section. As a member of the Library of Congress Labs team she is a Community Manager for By the People, a crowdsourcing project which invites the public to explore and make LC digital collections... Read More →
JB

Jordan Bass

Coordinator for Research Services and Digital Strategies, University of Manitoba Libraries
Jordan Bass is the Coordinator for Research Services and Digital Strategies at the University of Manitoba Libraries. His research to date has focused on personal digital archives, digital curation workflows as well as research data management.
avatar for Norie Guthrie

Norie Guthrie

Archivist - Special Collections Librarian, Woodson Research Center
Norie Guthrie specializes in collecting and processing music materials from the Houston Folk Music Archive, which she began in 2016. She and Scott Carlson edited "Music Preservation and Archiving Today" for Rowman & Littlefield, published May 2018.
avatar for Andrew Louis

Andrew Louis

Software Developer
Andrew Louis is a software developer from Toronto. After learning about the Memex and finding out that it was never built in 1945, he decided to try to build one. Previously, he was the co-founder and CTO of ShopLocket, an ecommerce startup acquired in 2014.


Tuesday April 24, 2018 4:20pm - 4:40pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX

4:40pm CDT

Closing Remarks
Speakers
avatar for Melody Condron

Melody Condron

University of Houston Libraries
@mtbeekeeper


Tuesday April 24, 2018 4:40pm - 4:45pm CDT
Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavillion University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library, 4333 University Drive, Houston, TX
 
Wednesday, April 25
 

9:30am CDT

Workshop: BitCurator NLP Workshop: Applying Natural Language Processing to Personal Digital Archives
We will demonstrate products of the BitCurator NLP project, which is developing software for libraries, archives and museums to extract and expose features (e.g. people, places, organizations, events, relationships, topics) in text from born-digital materials. The services and methods can be used by LAM professionals for appraisal and description, as well as facilitating a wider range of access and use scenarios.  The workshop will conclude with a discussion about issues related specifically to NLP for personal digital archives.

Attendance to this workshop is limited. Please sign up using the registration above.

To prepare:
If you have your own laptop, please plan to bring it and to install the software below so that you can follow along with the workshop. If you do not have a laptop we can have some available but you must email macondron@uh.edu to let us know, so we can mae sure we have enough available.

The needed software is VirtualBox, available for free download at https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Download_Old_Builds_5_2  - Windows machines will download build 5.2.8.

Instructions for installation can be found on pages 6-9 of this document: https://wiki.bitcurator.net/downloads/BitCurator-Quickstart.pdf note that the workshop will be using a different virtual machine (not BitCurator environment) so you do not need to follow the steps after that.

Speakers
avatar for Cal Lee

Cal Lee

Professor, University of North Carolina
Christopher (Cal) Lee is Professor at the School of Information and Library Science at UNC, Chapel Hill. He teaches courses and workshops in archives and records management. He is a Fellow of SAA, and he serves as editor of American Archivist.


Wednesday April 25, 2018 9:30am - 12:00pm CDT
UH Library, Room 10-G (Basement)

9:30am CDT

Worskhop: Using Free and Open Source Tools to Create Digital Archives
This is an introductory workshop on the use of open source and free software to create, validate, index, search, display and maintain a digital archive of various materials including photographs, and searchable oral histories.

Participation is limited for this workshop so please register above.

Speakers
avatar for John Sarnowski

John Sarnowski

Director, ResCarta Foundation
John Sarnowski is a director of the non-profit ResCarta Foundation and has over 25 years’ experience in building digital collections. He was responsible for creating millions of digital objects for learned societies, libraries and major corporations as the director of Imaging Products... Read More →


Wednesday April 25, 2018 9:30am - 12:00pm CDT
UH Library, Room 10-F (Basement)

10:00am CDT

Tour: Houston Metropolitan Research Center
Join archivists on a tour of Houston Public Library's Houston Metropolitan Research Center. The tour will include highlights of the historic Julia Ideson Building as well as the Digitization Lab.

Participation is limited so please sign up using the button below.

The Ideson Building is at 500 McKinney St. in downtown Houston, about 4 miles from UH. It's a short cab, Lyft, or Uber ride. Alternately, take public transit on the Metro Purple Line to the Theater District stop, and walk two blocks southwest on Smith Street.

Speakers
MR

Matt Richardson

Photography Archive Supervisor, Houston Public Library
Matt Richardson is the Photography Archive Supervisor at Houston Public Library's Houston Metropolitan Research Center. He is also involved in digital initiatives such as the Harvey Memories Project and HPL's participation in the Memory Lab Network. Prior to joining HPL, Matt worked... Read More →


Wednesday April 25, 2018 10:00am - 11:00am CDT
Julia Ideson Building 550 Mckinney St., Houston TX 77002